Teens Can Write, Too!

Changing the world's opinion… as soon as we finish this math homework

Action/2015

Action 2015

As writers, we know that our words have power. What we choose to say–and what we choose not to say–matters. After all, a group of people united behind a single idea, a group of people speaking out, can and does change the world. Therefore, words can change the world. Whether those words are in the form of books, tweets, blog posts, or shouted protests doesn’t matter–what really counts is that they’re out there.

That’s why TCWT is participating in the action/2015 campaign, which launches today (Jan 15th). The initiative is working in conjunction with the prominent organization Save the Children and is being supported by several global activism charities like the Malala Fund. Basically, it has a big reach, and thus it’s call for a unified voice this 2015 against pervasive global issues such as gender inequality, extreme poverty, and climate change won’t go unnoticed.

Here’s what the campaign has to say:

action/2015 is a growing citizen’s movement of hundreds of organizations around the world coming together to demand truly ambitious agreements on poverty, inequality and climate change in 2015.

2015 is when world leaders write their ‘to do lists’ for a generation and what comes out of those negotiations will reveal how ambitious they are – or aren’t – for the kind of world we can build together.

At the end of 2015, two global summits will bend the course of history. One summit will result in a new global framework for humanity – to tackle poverty and inequality. The other will set new climate action targets – a crucial step towards a safer planet.

By the last paragraph, they’re referring to the 2015 United Nations Climate Change Conference to be held in France in December, as well as the United Nations meeting about the Millennium Development Goals deadline, wherein they will set goals for the next fifteen years. Basically, the goal of the campaign is to amplify our voices to let lawmakers who will be attending these conferences know that we’re paying attention. (More details here.)

Obviously, you’d be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn’t want to try to end extreme poverty and gender inequality. Raising awareness about these issues isn’t what the campaign is about, since they aren’t inherently controversial. What the campaign wants, then, is for people to speak out. For lawmakers to know that they have to be ambitious in bettering our world, because all of us–all of you–will be watching.

If you’re reading this, here’s what I encourage you to do:

Send a tweet using the hashtag #action2015. Post a link to the campaign’s website on Facebook. Add the action/2015 badge to your blog sidebar for the week. Mention it in one of your blog posts. Take a picture of yourself holding a filled-out “I am ’15” sign (note: clicking this link will automatically download a PDF of the sign). Do something small–make your voice heard.

Yes, it will probably do nothing. Yes, a bunch of blog posts from all of us isn’t going to end, say, extreme poverty. Yes, you will probably be speaking into the void.

But – what if you aren’t? What if there’s a chance that, this time, we will be heard? So why not band together and try? Why not amplify our own voice using each other’s?

People have changed the world on much less.

IMG_7730

TCWT’s ’15 image as a part of the campaign

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One comment on “Action/2015

  1. Pingback: Q&A: Starting Is the Hard Part (Or, How to Get Creatively Re-Inspired) | Teens Can Write, Too!

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